Lead: On the last Saturday before Thanksgiving 1892 at Hampton Park in Springfield, Massachusetts, 21,500 fans watched the annual Harvard-Yale football game. After a scoreless first half, the Harvard team surprised its opponents with one of the most spectacular and controversial plays in football history. The "flying wedge" was born.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As it emerged in the late 19th century, the new American sport of football combined features of English rugby and soccer. Gradually, under the leadership of Walter Chauncey Camp who coached the Yale team from 1888 through 1892, the game adopted many of its distinguishing rules. Yet, from the beginning, football had a reputation for rough, even brutal competition. This was defended by many, including future President Theodore Roosevelt who wrote Camp in March, 1895 that he would not change the game's brutality. Football produced leaders and leaders can't be efficient unless they are manly. To him, rough football produced masculine vigor.