Quest for Mt. Everest III

Lead: After repeated pre-war attempts, in the early 1950s Mt. Everest finally bent to repeated assaults. The mountain was scaled by New Zealand beekeeper, Edmund Hillary, and Sherpa guide, Tensing Norgay.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: After World War II, Communist China invaded Tibet and blocked exploration of Everest from the North. The southern approaches were taken through Nepal and a reconnaissance expedition was mounted by that route in 1951 by the Brits. The following year two strong Swiss teams attempted to scale the mountain in the Spring and Fall but were stopped by severe weather both times just short of the summit.

Quest for Mt. Everest II

Lead: The challenge of Mt. Everest was clear from the time its height was determined in the 1800s, but attempts to reach the summit are not known to have begun until the 1920s.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The peak of Mt. Everest is one of earth’s most hostile places. The air is thin. No crops can be grown there. No domestic animals can live there. Any attempt on the summit would require taking along those things necessary to sustain life. Long months of adaptation to the high altitude, supplementary oxygen in tanks, food and water would have to be dragged up nearly impassible terrain which, in the early days, no one had ever crossed. The key to the eventual success of the assault on Everest was a nomadic people, Tibetan-speaking clans who struggled for survival on the lower slopes of the mountain by trading and herding livestock. These are the Sherpa. They were capable of carrying the large loads of supplies that made the climb possible.

Quest for Mt. Everest I

Lead: The highest point on earth is the peak of Mt. Everest, part of a geologic eruption along the crest of the Himalayas on the border between Nepal and Tibet. Until 1953 no one had been able to go up there.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is known as Chomolungma, Goddess Mother of the World, and it towers 29,035 feet above sea level, dwarfing the glaciers that wrap themselves around its base. Until 1852 when its true height was determined at a distance by an India surveyor, the mountain was known simply as Peak 15. In 1865, it was named for Sir George Everest, previously Surveyor General of India.

Henry’s Wives: Anne Boleyn

Lead: Anne Boleyn refused to be Henry VIII's mistress.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: She was not particularly beautiful, although she had dark hair, fine eyes, a long neck which gave her a certain graceful authority and a vivacious personality. Her sister Mary had been the king's mistress. The teenaged Anne followed her to court. From 1519 to 1522 she was educated and received a measure of social polish in the household of the Queen of France. At the outbreak of war between the two countries Anne returned from France and came back to court. Sometime in the next three years she caught the attention of Henry and he joined a not inconsiderable number of males at court vying for the girl's affection. By 1525 the competition dropped by the wayside and their relationship had become somewhat more than a royal dalliance.

 

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Henry’s Wives: Anne of Cleves

Lead: Henry VIII at last had a son but lost his Queen to sickness associated with childbirth. He needed a new wife.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: After mourning the loss of Queen Jane Seymour Henry set out to find a new wife. As a husband the King of England left much to be desired. He was fat and overbearing and had an unsavory reputation among royal families in Europe at the time. After all he had dismissed his first wife in the middle of great international dispute, married his mistress, chopped off her head and then married hr lady-in-waiting. Perhaps it was the jokes currently in fashion that made the search for a fourth royal wife so ludicrous. The young Duchess Christian of Milan may not have said that if she had two necks, the King should have one of them, but such a myth was consistent with the general trend of gossip abroad at the beginning of 1538. Mary de Guise of France might not actually have reacted to the Henry's expressed interest in her voluptuous figure by remarking that she might be a big women, but she had a very little neck, but, as you can see the King had a problem.

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Spy Satellites

Lead: It was mid-August 1960. In a White House ceremony, President Dwight D. Eisenhower displayed a United States flag that been recovered from an environmental satellite orbiting the earth. He wasn’t exactly telling the whole truth.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Actually, the flag had been carried into orbit aboard Discoverer XIII and was returned to earth in an ejected capsule which was then recovered from its splash down point northwest of Hawaii by a Navy taskforce. It was the first time an object had been catapulted into earth orbit and brought back without mishap, but this exercise was far more than patriotic chauvinism. The Discoverer program was a ruse, a clever cover-up for a secret reconnaissance operation known as Corona.

Flying Wedge

Lead: On the last Saturday before Thanksgiving 1892 at Hampton Park in Springfield, Massachusetts, 21,500 fans watched the annual Harvard-Yale football game. After a scoreless first half, the Harvard team surprised its opponents with one of the most spectacular and controversial plays in football history. The "flying wedge" was born.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As it emerged in the late 19th century, the new American sport of football combined features of English rugby and soccer. Gradually, under the leadership of Walter Chauncey Camp who coached the Yale team from 1888 through 1892, the game adopted many of its distinguishing rules. Yet, from the beginning, football had a reputation for rough, even brutal competition. This was defended by many, including future President Theodore Roosevelt who wrote Camp in March, 1895 that he would not change the game's brutality. Football produced leaders and leaders can't be efficient unless they are manly. To him, rough football produced masculine vigor.

Electric Chair

Lead: Caught up in the frenzy of competition in the early days of electric power, Thomas Edison gave impetus to development of the twentieth century’s most fearsome form of judicial execution, the electric chair.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 1880s, inventor Thomas Edison and industrialist George Westinghouse were locked in a fierce competition over the future of electric power. The issue was transmission. Edison championed direct current, Westinghouse, in alliance with the brilliant and erratic Nikola Tesla, was an advocate of alternating current. Westinghouse eventually prevailed because AC, with its more efficient distribution over longer distances, was clearly the superior choice.