1968: The Assassination of Robert Francis Kennedy I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: In the wake of Eugene McCarthy’s unexpectedly strong showing in the March 1968 New Hampshire primary, Senator Robert F. Kennedy of New York, former Attorney General and brother of slain President Kennedy, seeing political opportunity, entered the race for the Democratic nomination. Approaching the contest with the energy that attended nearly all the enterprises of that generation of Kennedys, after several months of nonstop campaigning, he was beginning to show his age, a characteristic optimism tempered by weariness. He was now the patriarch of the extended Kennedy clan, plus he and Ethyl had a huge family of their own. On one occasion he told reporters “If I lose, I’ll go home and raise the next generation of Kennedys”. With 11 children he was well on the way to creating that on his own.

 

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Muslim Conquest of Spain II

Lead: Following the expansionist inclination of the Umayyad caliphate of Damascus, evangelical Islam by 714 had conquered almost all of the Iberian peninsula. In Spain they created a brand new society.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Disunity among Christians, powerful armies, and a sense of spiritual inevitability compelled the armies of God north through Spain and into central France. Everywhere Islam swept all before it. Not until the Christian Franks outflanked and defeated the Muslims at the first Battle of Poitiers in 732, did the Islamic tide recede and retreat.

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Muslim Conquest of Spain I

Lead: The expansion of Islam in the centuries after the Prophet Muhammad’s death flowed east to India and west to the Visigothic kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula. Spain had powerful Moorish rule for more than seven centuries.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From 712 to 1492 some part of Spain was under Muslim control. At high tide, Arabs ruled almost all of Iberia. In the end, only Granada, dominated by the massive Alhambra fortress, could resist the Reconquista, the re-conquest of the peninsula, led finally by Christian forces united under Ferdinand and Isabella. The city surrendered in the year Spain turned its attention outward and sent Christopher Columbus on his journey to a new world.
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Armed Forces Radio II

Lead: During World War II the British Broadcasting Corporation and the American Forces Radio (AFN) had to be forced to work together in support of the Normandy invasion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Required to give up its monopoly on radio broadcasting in Britain during World War II, the BBC welcomed the fledgling GI network with surprising grace considering its previous opposition. BBC helped AFN with studios, engineering assistance and expertise, but it was not easy. The Brits strove for scrupulous accuracy in their broadcasts and were offended at the informal American broadcast style and occasional willingness to use questionable sources and interpretation in news reporting. They considered AFN to have accomplished a great deal, but that it was really little more than a small town operation, with announcers that were illiterate, unresourceful, and couldn't even read scripts very well.

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Armed Forces Radio I

Lead: During World War II, to the lonely GI, Armed Forces Radio was a welcome reminder of home. It is a part of the war that continues to this day.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1942 Allied forces began to assemble for the Normandy invasion in bases throughout the English countryside. For many, this was the first time away from home and they missed it. To pass the time they listened to the radio, and for that the only choice was the British Broadcasting Company. This was the heyday of the BBC. All over Europe, indeed, all over the world, those who could listen were dependent on the BBC for news that was largely free from bias, very accurate, and absent the hopeless propaganda that poured out of Berlin, Rome and Tokyo. To the American ear, however, the BBC was deadly dull. The music was boring, the humor dry and out of context, the announcers starchy and pretentious.

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Peggy Marsh (Mitchell) Writes Her Book: Gone with The Wind

Lead: In the late 1930s a young woman from Georgia won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. It was her only book. She called it Another Day.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Peggy Marsh was an unreconstructed Southerner and held the Old South and its legends almost in reverence. She felt that twentieth-century generations were losing touch with the old ways and that the culture she revered was becoming all but lost. In the mid-1920s she resolved to write a book, a novel that would tell the story of the Old South.

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Coretta Scott King II

Lead: In the years before and after the assassination of her husband, Coretta Scott King provided strong leadership within the civil rights movement.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was not easy residing at the center of the maelstrom, raising a large family, taking a supportive role at the side of one of humanity’s most consequential figures, but, nevertheless, Coretta King rose to take the role of leader. She escaped and stood strong when white supremacists directed violence against their family. When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was awarded the Nobel Peace prize, she was by his side.

 

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Coretta Scott King I

Lead: In the pantheon of the civil rights movement Martin Luther King, Jr., and his wife, Coretta Scott King, shine most brightly.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the issue of African-American Civil rights forced itself onto the American national agenda, it is not surprising that the prosperous, educated, black upper-class should feel most acutely the second-class status which America’s white majority enforced so vigorously to keep them in their place.

 

 

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