American Revolution: The Intolerable Acts III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Soon after the passage of the so-called Intolerable Acts, particularly the closing of the Port of Boston, concern began to spread throughout the colonies. Great apprehension was expressed in the Virginia House of Burgesses. Leading the effort were Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee whose measure decried the “hostile invasion” perpetrated on Boston and, in a manner designed to evoke memories of the English Civil War, called for a “Day of Fasting, Humiliation, and Prayer,” asking for Divine intervention to prevent a destruction of civil rights and the onset of Civil War. Such words were well-received in Puritan Boston, but Lord Dunmore, Virginia’s governor, was not pleased and dissolved the House.

American Revolution: The Intolerable Acts II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: As news of the Boston Tea Party spread through London, the government responded with a series of laws that came to be known in America as the Intolerable Acts. This legislation was designed not only to secure reimbursement for the lost tea but also to punish the colonists for their seditious actions. It was hoped such a course of action would restore some measure of Parliamentary authority in North America. The first law closed the Port of Boston to ocean-going trade. Without even a cursory attempt at hearing Boston’s side the measure sailed through the Commons and the Lords with inordinate speed. Boston was to be shut up tight by June 15th.

American Revolution: The Intolerable Acts I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: On the night of December 16, 1773, a group of Massachusetts citizens, angry at the small tax they were forced to pay on British East India Company tea, dressed themselves ‘in the Indian manner,’ faces blackened, and wrapped in blankets, boarded three vessels tied to Griffins Wharf and tossed 45 tons of tea, worth approximately £10,000, into the quiet waters of Boston Bay.

Mountain Meadows Massacre Part II

Lead: On September 11, 1857 am emigrant wagon train from Arkansas bound for southern California and peacefully camped in a meadow in southwestern Utah was fatally attacked by Mormans and their Indian allies.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Baker-Fancher Party stopped at Mountain Meadows off the Spanish Trail. The meadow was a popular respite for wagon trains before crossing the Mojave Desert on route to California. They became innocent victims in a bitter running dispute between Mormons, members of the Church of Latter- day Saints and the United States government.

 

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Mountain Meadows Massacre Part I

Lead: In March 1857, a wagon train filled with emigrants set off from Arkansas to build a new life in California. Their hopes were high until they reached Mountain Meadows in western Utah.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The well-organized and equipped party, led by experienced guides Alexander Fancher and John Baker, consisted of 140 men, women and children and included large herds of cattle and horses.

 

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Suez Canal III

Lead: Facing almost universal skepticism, the Suez Canal Company under Ferdinand de Lesseps raised the money and dug the Canal.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Prime Minister Palmerston of Britain called him a swindler and a fool. Bankers such as Baron de Rothschild rejected his pleas for capital. Yet, de Lesseps succeeded against all odds. Raising money from small investors and operating with a design approved by the International Commission for the Piercing of the Isthmus of Suez, he broke ground in 1859 near the future Port Said. It took ten years to construct the canal. At any given point 30,000 workers were employed often under harsh, forced conditions. More than a million were so engaged and thousands of laborers died on the project. Progress was often delayed by labor disputes and the outbreak of diseases such as cholera, but in the end the canal was completed primarily due to the importation of giant French-designed steam shovels and dredges.

 

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Suez Canal II

Lead: In 1869, finally, the land bridge between Egypt and Suez was pierced with a canal, thanks in large measure to Ferdinand de Lesseps.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: He was no engineer, had no great fortune, had no access to capital, and was in no way an effective administrator, unanimated by tedium. Yet, if anyone might be called the Father of the Suez, it was de Lesseps. Other than his indefatigable energy and dedication to the project, he largely succeeded in building the canal because of his personal connection to two people.

 

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Suez Canal I

Lead: In 1869 French engineers and Egyptian laborers completed work eliminating one of the world’s two great blocks to navigation. They opened the canal at Suez.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until the 19th and 20th centuries there were two significant places in the world where the passage of oceangoing commerce and transportation were impeded by relatively short land bridges. The Isthmus of Panama fell before the assaults of U.S. doctors and engineers in 1914. Creating a passage between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea was much longer in coming. It had attracted the attention of rulers such as Ramesses II of the 12th Egyptian dynasty in the 2nd Millennium BCE and Persian conqueror Darius I. They built narrow canals from the Nile to the Red Sea but these soon fell into disuse.

 

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