Leadership: Wilma Mankiller

Lead: Leadership often comes from the most unlikely persons. In 1985 Wilma Mankiller became the first female chief of a major Indian tribe. Her leadership style and methods were quiet but very effective.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Mankiller was one of eleven children born in Tahlequah, Oklahoma in 1945. She was named for a Cherokee ancestor, a high-ranking warrior of ancient lineage. Wilma grew up in rural, impoverished Mankiller Flats on land given to her paternal grandfather in 1907 when Oklahoma achieved statehood. In the mid-1950s drought and the attending failure of their farm forced the family to move to San Francisco as part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Relocation Program. This program was established to help resettle poor rural Native Americans in an urban setting.

 

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LFM Custer’s Last Stand II

Lead: For 400 years, service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Armstrong Custer, leading the Seventh United States Cavalry Regiment, was participating in a three-army campaign. They were sent by General Philip Sheridan to discipline several warlike Indian tribes who, by the spring of 1876, had drifted off their reservations into the valley of the Little Bighorn River in southern Montana. Custer's regiment was part of the army led by General Alfred Terry that had left Fort Abraham Lincoln on the Missouri River in June. The object of the three armies was to converge, find the wandering Indians, punish them and drag them chastened back to the reservation.

 

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LFM Custer’s Last Stand I

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The deaths of George Armstrong Custer and his men were rooted in a fundamental disagreement about the way people should live. In the early 1800s a youthful United States began to formulate a policy toward its Indian population. Few stopped to consider the opinions of American Indians who had lived on the North American continent for centuries. The solution was to push these aboriginal tribes west, across the Mississippi to mix with their western cousins, leaving white civilization in peace.

 

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The Knights Templar II

Lead: Beginning in 1307, jealousy, envy, desire to appropriate its vast assets and the waning purpose for its existence, brought arrest, torture, trial and eventual dissolution to the Knights Templar.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: Born of crisis in the years following the First Crusade, the Knights Templar was also known as the Temple. It was an order of warrior monks assigned to defend the Holy Land from Muslim forces. To finance its military and charitable mission, the Temple took donations of cash and real estate from all over Catholic Europe and the Mediterranean. The Templars even developed a rudimentary form of banking which permitted east-bound pilgrims to deposit funds in, say, Spain and to carry a letter of credit which they could cash when they reached the Holy Land. All this was making the Templars very very rich.

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Abigail Fillmore

Lead: Well-read and cultured, Abigail Fillmore maintained a well-tuned political sense in an otherwise lackluster administration.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When Abigail Power’s preacher father died in 1799, her mother migrated to Cayuga County, then on the New York frontier. Mrs. Powers took responsibility for the education of the children and so well did she did do her job that by the time she was nineteen Abigail was teaching in a country school near Sempronius, New York. In the winter of 1818, she looked up from her desk into the bright, inquiring eyes of a big farm boy who had appeared in her classroom with little notice. The eighteen-year-old was ambitious to become a lawyer and Abigail responded to his enthusiasm. His name was Milliard Fillmore and after an eight-year courtship, much of the time spent apart as he was reading for the bar, they began a twenty-seven year marriage.

 

 

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Charles Kettering and the Auto-Starter I

Lead: Until the second decade of the twentieth century, the automobile was largely the play-toy of the wealthy. In 1911, however, Charles Franklin Kettering helped change all by getting the thing started.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early 1910, Byron T. Carter coasted by a stalled automobile on the Belle Isle Bridge in Detroit. He stopped to help the lady, took the metal crank, put it in the slot at the front of the engine, gave it a vigorous turn, it caught, snapped back, and broke his jaw. An elderly man, Carter contacted pneumonia in the hospital and shortly thereafter he died - another victim of the arm strong auto starter. This time, however, things would change. One of Carter’s friends was Henry Leland, President of the Cadillac Motor Car Company. He determined at that moment that no Cadillac in the future would be responsible for death or injury due to crank starting. It was said at the time that to start a car one “required the strength of a Samson, the cunning of Ulysses and the speed of Hermes.” The car would never become more than a frivolous and expensive toy if you needed a chauffer or a weight-lifting regime to simply start the thing.

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Folies Bergere

Lead: Historically, the human desire for diversion and entertainment, like religion, morals and politics, is always nearly subject to evolution and changing tastes. Consider as an example if you will the Parisian Folies Bergère:

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: When it comes to entertainment, with apologies to F. Scott Fitzgerald, the French are not like you and me. From the middle of the 19th century until surpassed by American culture in the age of mass communication, the undisputed pace setter in entertainment was France. French theater was considered by many to be indecent, even obscene; it was certainly provocative and pushed the edge of the envelope in morals and taste. For most of that period, since its founding in 1869 as the Folies Trevise, both taking their names from nearby streets, the Folies Bergère always strove to be out front, slightly racier than the competition.

 

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Lincoln and Re-election

Lead: In 1864, with the country mired in a Civil War, the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln was by no means assured.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In retrospect, by the early months of 1864 it is possible to see the Confederacy as being on the ropes. Southern resources and troops were running out and the last great attempt at invasion had come to grief on the gentle slopes of Gettysburg the previous summer. But this was not apparent to a United States electorate weary of war and three years of sacrifice, and they were flirting with idea of dumping the incumbent. Whatever may have been the role played by Cabinet officials, military officers, or members of Congress, in the people's mind, the Chief Architect of the war to restore the Union was Abraham Lincoln. He was the object of praise in victory but in the winter of 1864, fairly or not, he was viewed by many as the author of stalemate. For that Lincoln was in political trouble.

 

 

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