Last Full Measure -Berlin Airlift

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By July 1948 the Soviet Union no longer was willing to tolerate West Berlin. After the war, the Soviet Union forced Communist governments on most of those Eastern European nations its army had occupied, and erected barriers to impede communications, trade, and travel between East and West. Yet, it was Germany that would prove to be the most serious irritant between the two emerging Cold War coalitions. The Soviets occupied the eastern zone while the western zones of Germany were administered by the United States, France, and Britain.

.

 

Read more →

A House Divided: The Fall of Atlanta II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having pushed Confederate armies under Joseph Johnston back from the suburbs of Chattanooga to within 20 miles of his goal, the vital railroad and manufacturing hub of Atlanta, William Sherman was briefly stymied in late June at Kennesaw Mountain with heavy losses. Summer rains had turned the Georgia clay to muck in June, but by early July these roads had begun to dry. Sherman’s maneuver machine was back in business. He crossed the Chattahoochee River on July 9th and was at Peachtree Creek, four miles from the City, the next day. Panic struck the civilian population as Sherman’s relentless campaign seemed on the verge of success.

A House Divided: The Fall of Atlanta I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In Summer 1864 a sense of malaise and depression gripped the North as the fortunes of Federal armies seemed to flag. Not since the heady days of Confederate triumph in the winter and spring of 1862 and 1863 did the cause of the Union seem so hopeless. In many ways this was a product of war weariness after three years of almost constant conflict and a sense that the Union war strategy had bogged down in Georgia and Virginia, but also it grew from the effusion of blood that attended Yankee forces at seemingly every turn. The horrific slaughter at Cold Harbor had led to stalemate in front of Petersburg, and though Phillip Sheridan eventually rolled up Jubal Early in the Shenandoah Valley, that would not come until deep into the Fall.

Conscription, A Confederate Paradox II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In spring 1862, with Yankee victories in the West and George McClelland’s huge 100,000 man juggernaut slowly creeping up the peninsula between the James and the York Rivers toward Richmond, Confederate fortunes never had seemed at such an ebb. Therefore, Jefferson Davis and the Confederate Congress instituted conscription, drafting into the rebel armies men between the ages of 18 and 35 who would not willingly re-enlist or volunteer for a term of up to three years. Davis could not seem to win for losing, however. His Confederate political enemies whom he affectionately called “snakes,” began to attack him as being worse than Lincoln, engaged in the acts of a tyrant.

Read more →

Conscription, A Confederate Paradox I

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Jefferson Davis called them cats and snakes and they snapped at him from all sides. The cats demanded that he pursue the Southern war effort with more enthusiasm and audaciousness. The snakes attacked him when he and the Confederate government did just that. With the depressing news of rebel defeats flooding in from the West and the attendant near-complete cutting of the Confederacy in two along the Mississippi, in spring 1862 the Davis administration forced through Congress two radical and most un-Confederate-like measures which set the snakes to a venomous roil, martial law and conscription. The latter proved to be the most controversial and the one that touched Southerners most directly. It was clearly a Confederate paradox.

Read more →

A House Divided: The Tide Turns IV

 

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The American Civil War, Phase One, 1860-1861, Confederate Consolidation; Phase Two, 1861-Spring 1862, Union Ascendancy, particularly in the West; Phase Three, Spring 1862 through Gettysburg, Confederate Ascendancy; Phase Four, July 1863 through Spring 1864, The Tide Turns; Phase Five, Stalemate in Virginia, Union triumph in the South and West.