1968: Biafran Terror Famine I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: Almost from the time of Nigerian independence in 1960, Biafra, an oil rich region in the eastern part of that West African nation, began agitating for its own independence. By 1968 the region was engulfed in a full-blown civil war. That was not the way it was supposed to be. In the years immediately following freedom from Great Britain, Nigeria seemed to be on the verge of accomplishing something rare on the African continent. It appeared to be shaping itself into an ethnically diverse democracy. Soon, however, this idyllic dream began to fall apart with conflicts arising between regions and the 250 ethnic groups in the country.

Read more →

Sunni and Shi’a Muslims: Differences in Degree II

Lead: After the death of the Prophet Muhammad disputes within and with members of his family created a severe and long lasting division among Muslims. The Sunni and Shi’a split continues to divide that faith into the modern era.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Shi’a revere the Prophet’s cousin and son-in-law Ali who claimed the mantle of his kinsman, but who was assassinated in disputes that firmly established the split between his followers and the vast majority of adherents to Islam known as the Sunni.

 

Read more →

Sunni and Shi’a Muslims: Differences in Degree I

Lead: One of the great religious divisions in world history has sundered Islam. Originating almost at the beginning, the divide between Sunni and Shi’a encompasses gaps that are ethnic, political and religious.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In day to day religious practice the differences between the two great Muslim sects, Sunni and Shi’a, are negligible. Yet, in reality, this unity of devotion to Allah masks powerful religious and political variance within Islam and even within two great traditions themselves.

 

 

Read more →

The U.S. and the Union of Canada II

Lead: U.S. efforts to annex Canada in the 19th century helped focus the minds of Canadian politicians, often at odds on other matters, on the need to create a single nation state able to assert and maintain Canada as an independent and sovereign nation.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1867 Canadian statesman Thomas D'Arcy McGee said, "they [the Americans] coveted Florida, and they seized it; they coveted Louisiana, and purchased it; they coveted Texas, and stole it... The acquisition of Canada was the first ambition of the American Confederacy, and never ceased to be..." He was not wrong to be so concerned. Throughout the 19th century until the establishment of the Dominion of Canada, there was a real and present danger that the United States with its superior military, financial resources, and population might reach out to absorb Canada into the growing colossus of North America.

Read more →

The U.S. and the Union of Canada I

Lead: During the 19th century Canada gained its virtual independence from Great Britain and established a Dominion of the provinces. This drive to Union in no small part was compelled by threats, real and imagined, from the colossus to the south.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The United States and Canada have always had what could be described as a love/hate relationship. Particularly as the U.S. has grown in size, population, confidence, and some might say, hubris, Canadians of all languages and political sentiments have cast nervous glances southward to gauge the mood of their ever-increasingly large and powerful neighbor. Their desire was to protect Canada’s cultural and political independence. They were not wrong in doing so.

Read more →

The Last Full Measure – Francis Marion, The Swamp Fox

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: From the opening of hostilities at Lexington and Concord in 1775 until signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the Revolution was America's longest war until the Vietnam conflict. While tension between Loyalist and Patriot sympathizers continued throughout the former colonies, active fighting for the most part had shifted to the South after 1779. First Savannah, then Charleston fell, and British forces under Lord Cornwallis began a series of raids into the interior culminating in the Battle of Camden, South Carolina in August, 1780. Patriot forces under the command of General Horatio Gates suffered a disastrous defeat. After that there appeared almost nothing standing in the way of ultimate victory for the British commanders. In 1780 the fleeting hopes of American Independence were kept alive in the South by partisan guerrillas.

 

Read more →

Mountain Meadows Massacre Part II

Lead: On September 11, 1857 am emigrant wagon train from Arkansas bound for southern California and peacefully camped in a meadow in southwestern Utah was fatally attacked by Mormans and their Indian allies.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Baker-Fancher Party stopped at Mountain Meadows off the Spanish Trail. The meadow was a popular respite for wagon trains before crossing the Mojave Desert on route to California. They became innocent victims in a bitter running dispute between Mormons, members of the Church of Latter- day Saints and the United States government.

 

Read more →

Mountain Meadows Massacre Part I

Lead: In March 1857, a wagon train filled with emigrants set off from Arkansas to build a new life in California. Their hopes were high until they reached Mountain Meadows in western Utah.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The well-organized and equipped party, led by experienced guides Alexander Fancher and John Baker, consisted of 140 men, women and children and included large herds of cattle and horses.

 

Read more →