Jamestown Journey: New Jersey Gives Women the Vote

Lead: In its 1776 constitution, almost by accident, the state of New Jersey gave women the right to vote.

 Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: The New Jersey Constitution was a hastily assembled affair, put together under the pressure of wartime. It's only requirement for suffrage was a property requirement. The franchise was extended to all inhabitants who were worth £50 or more. This included women and, for that matter, free blacks who were able to muster the financial assets. This did not mean that women voted in large numbers at first. Few married women owned property independently from their husbands. That left prosperous single women and widows who were not in abundance.

 

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Scopes Monkey Trial III

Lead: In the hot summer of 1925 the State of Tennessee prosecuted John Thomas Scopes for teaching the theory of evolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: While a believer in evolution, Scopes merely made his students aware of Darwin's theory in the run-up to their end-of-the-year examinations. At stake was the constitutionality of the Butler Act, Tennessee's statute outlawing teaching anything contrary to the Bible.

Scopes Monkey Trial II

Lead: In the summer of 1925, in Dayton, Tennessee, William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow met in legal conflict during the trial of John Thomas Scopes. Their clash was as much cultural as it was legal.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Scopes agreed to be the defendant in a case testing the constitutionality of the Butler Act which was Tennessee's attempt to prevent teaching of ideas in the public schools thought to be in conflict with the Bible. The prosecution invited William Jennings Bryan to lead its team. John Scopes accepted the help of Clarence Darrow in the defense.

Scopes Monkey Trial I

Lead: In the summer of 1925, in Dayton, a small mining town in Eastern Tennessee, a teacher of high school biology was brought to trial for teaching the theory of evolution.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: On a sunny May afternoon, John Thomas Scopes, a popular twenty-five year old biology teacher, was playing tennis with some of his students. At the end of the game he noticed a small boy obviously waiting for him at courtside. The youngster had a message. His presence was requested at Fred Robinson's drugstore. There he found several of the town's leading citizens and they had a proposition. A recent issue of the Chattanooga News contained an offer by the American Civil Liberties Union to pay the expenses of anyone willing to test the constitutionality of the Butler Act. Robinson and Sue Hicks wanted to know if Scopes would let himself become the legal guinea pig in a case testing the legality of the Act.

Winston Churchill’s Iron Curtain Speech II

Lead: In March, 1945 Winston Churchill gave his famous "Iron-Curtain" Speech in Fulton, Missouri. It was not given as an idle gesture.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the days after World War II, the United States began to explore the path of accommodation with the Soviet Union. Under the new President, Harry Truman, and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, America began to draw away from the British, who were increasingly isolated and under Soviet pressure in the Balkans, Iran and the Mediterranean. Truman was following the course laid out by his predecessor, Franklin Roosevelt, but as 1945 drew to a close, important elements of public opinion began to criticize this policy. Secretary of Defense James Forestall and other military leaders were fearful of Soviet power and expansion and urged the President to a more militant approach to the Russians. This was echoed by certain key Republicans such as Senator Arthur Vandenberg and influential shapers of opinion like Henry R. Luce, publisher of Time Magazine, and the editors of the New York Times.

Winston Churchill’s Iron Curtain Speech I

Lead: On March 5, 1946 at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, Winston Churchill delivered one of the most important speeches in post-World War II history. It signaled the beginning of the Cold War.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The alliance of necessity between the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union began to show signs of decay with the defeat of Germany in April, 1945. The traditional American isolationism and reluctance to be drawn into permanent foreign entangling alliances was, in the absence of an immediate perceived enemy threat, rearing its head. Americans were tired of war and many were not as fearful of growing Soviet power as were their British cousins. This tended to counter the pressure of those advisors surrounding the new and inexperienced President Truman who would have the United States take vigorous leadership in international affairs. Some close to the President actually advocated closer Soviet/American ties. All of this meant the British felt themselves increasingly out in the cold and under pressure from the Soviets in many places such Iran, the Balkans, and the Mediterranean.

Jamestown Journey: The South’s Use of Slaves in War II

Lead: At the beginning of the Civil War South faced a quandary. Should it use its slaves or not and how.

 Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: Both north and south were ambivalent about the role African-Americans would play in the coming conflagration. With emancipation the road seemed clear for black participation in the Union effort. The issues were much more complex. They were philosophical and practical. From a practical point of view, they could be an effective human resource in the absence of whites who went off to war. They could use for municipal projects and could be used in the construction of  defensive placements in front of vulnerable southern cities such as Vicksburg Richmond Petersburg.

 

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Jamestown Journey: The South’s Use of Slaves in War I

Lead: Prior to the Civil War, southern slave owners could make a quick profit in the domestic slave market.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: The growth of King Cotton as the dominant southern cash crop during the 1800s, increased the demand for slaves. To meet this demand, slave owners in the tobacco regions of the Upper South who had excess slaves or needed to get out of debt, would sell them. They used private transactions and a network of traders and auction houses.

 

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