St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre II

Lead: Angered by being squeezed out of policy making and the growth of Protestant influence over her son Charles IX, Queen Mother Katherine de Medici planned to take out her enemies in a single night of blood.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the summer of 1572, the eyes of France were on Paris where the sister of the King was getting married. She was to become the bride of Prince Henry of Navarre and the King hoped their union would bring an end to a decade of religious warfare between Protestant and Catholic.

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St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre I

Lead: Catherine De Medici, Queen Mother of France, thought she could bring an end to religious warfare by killing off Protestant leaders in one great stroke.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: For two years since 1570, France had enjoyed an uneasy peace. France was split into three hostile camps. The first camp was Protestants, Catholics who believed the pope in Rome should rule the church and national Catholics who supported a Catholic church controlled by the King of France.

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Integration Comes to Little Rock

Lead: Opposition to the desegregation of Central High School was the beginning of a decade of resistance in the South.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1954 the Supreme Court of the United States decided in Brown vs. The Topeka Board of Education that separate but equal schools were unconstitutional. In the wake of the subsequent decree that instructed parties to pursue desegregation with "all deliberate speed," the Little Rock, Arkansas School Board a fairly progressive body at that time began planning to desegregate the schools.

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Trail of Tears II

Lead: Despite their willingness to become more like the white majority in the 1830s the Cherokee were removed from the mountains of the South and sent to Oklahoma.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1802 the state of Georgia gave up its claims to Alabama and Mississippi territory. In return, the federal government promised to resettle Native Americans in the West. By the late 1820s this had not been done and newly elected President Andrew Jackson was sympathetic with Georgia's position. In his first message to Congress asked that it to provide for the removal of the Cherokee. Sensing victory the state of Georgia passed a series of laws that abolishing Cherokee government and dividing Cherokee land to be distributed by lottery to Georgia citizens. The Cherokee took their case to the Supreme Court and the Court declared in favor of the Indians. Georgia refused to recognize Supreme Court jurisdiction and Jackson refused to enforce the law.

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Trail of Tears I

Lead: Often a nation's actions don't live up to its ideals.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The record of the United States in dealing with Native Americans is a mixed one. National policy toward the Indians, often idealistic and well-meaning in its intention, has been punctuated with broken treaties, untruths and often intentional disregard for human and property rights. The experience of the Cherokee was particularly dramatic. More than any most tribes, the Cherokee attempted to adjust themselves to the ever expanding American culture.

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Say It Ain’t So Joe (Jackson: Baseball History)

Lead: In the annals of baseball few figures are as pitiful as Shoeless Joe Jackson.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Joseph Jefferson Jackson was born in Brandon Mills, South Carolina before the turn of the century. His family was large and very poor. Receiving no formal education he began work in the local textile mill at the age of 13. He began to play baseball and soon caught the attention of Philadelphia Manager Connie Mack who overcame the boy's shyness and started him with the Athletics in 1908.

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Emma Lazarus

Lead: At first reluctant, Emma Lazarus gave in and wrote the words that helped build the symbol of America's welcome.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The money wasn't coming in and Joseph Pulitzer was becoming very frustrated. Publisher of the New York World, a Hungarian immigrant who fought in the Civil War, Pulitzer had taken, as his personal crusade, the task of raising money to build the pedestal on which the colossus was to rest. The arrangement was that France would supply the statue if the United States would build the base. Work in Paris was on schedule but in America, people did not seem to be very concerned.

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Fall of Dien Bien Phu

Lead: The French needed a big victory to pave the way for an honorable withdrawal from Vietnam.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1953 even the most enthusiastic colonialist in the French government knew France would have to pull out of Vietnam. A Summit conference was set for late April 1954 in Geneva and the French needed to beat the communists decisively on the battlefield to set the stage for a favorable result. The commander in Vietnam, General Navarre, decided to place troops, high in the mountains in a valley near the village of Dien Bien Phu. He reasoned that when the Communists came out of the jungle, he would catch them in a pitched battle and defeat them.

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