Kim Philby, Spying for the Other Side I

Lead: Polished and elegant, with upper-class education and heritage, Kim Philby in the 1940s rose in the ranks of British intelligence. He was, however, spying for the other side.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Harold Adrian Russell Philby grew up in India. Early on his father, a fixture in the British Civil Service there gave him the name Kim, after a Rudyard Kipling character. While studying at Trinity College, Cambridge in the mid-1930s, Philby came under the influence of Professor Maurice Dodd. His mentor reinforced in the boy a powerful trend among intellectuals in that decade. Many of them looked at the socialist experiment in the Soviet Union and believed they had discovered the future, a system that would transform mankind for the better. Ignoring the corrupt, inefficient, brutal and oppressive character of Stalinism, they became quiet, and sometimes not so quiet, champions of communism. Kim Philby became a life-long true believer.

Read more →

Australian Gold Rush

Lead: On January 20, 1788, six transports delivered 750 convicts to Botany Bay. Sixty-five years and 168,000 prisoners later, the practice of deportation to New South Wales was abruptly terminated.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In January, 1851 Edward Hargraves returned to Sydney, Australia. He had spent some time in the Gold Fields during the first years after its discovery in California. This reminded him of similar geological formations he had noted in territory along the Macquarie River northwest of Sydney two decades before.

Read more →

George Sand

Lead: In November 1830 in a chateau in central France, an unhappy 26-year-old woman discovered in her husband’s desk a fat envelope on which was written her name and the words, “Only to be Opened After My Death.” For the Baroness Aurore Dudevant it became cause for her declaration of independence.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the packet, her husband Casimir had poured out volumes of bitterness and rancor built up in their years of marriage. For Aurore the role of dutiful wife and mother of their two young ones had never been particularly agreeable and the letter seemed good cause to break away from a man with whom she had little in common and whom she considered a drunken idler. Though her inheritance had provided the family its income, a married women in that era had little rights to her own money therefore when Madame Dudevant left for Paris she had to make her living as a writer.

Read more →

American Revolution: Britain at the Crossroads III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: From the American point of view, Britons, in the run-up to the Revolution, were united in their opposition to colonial aspirations for self-rule. Such is not even close to reality. While the government and Parliamentary majority were determined to make the colonies submit to British sovereignty, there were members of the ruling class and Parliamentarians that were very sympathetic with the American cause. One such leader was the elder William Pitt, who as first minister, brought order to Britain’s flailing during the first part of the Seven Years’ War and secured the ultimate and overwhelming victory. He was rewarded with an earldom and as the Earl of Chatham he sat in the House of Lords and occasionally attempted to speak sanity into the debate over America. He made one final attempt to restore comity in January 1775. In a surprise move he proposed to withdraw troops from Boston and while avowing Parliament’s authority, he asserted that the colonies should not be taxed without their agreement. In return the colonies should give the Crown a regular subsidy. The Intolerable Acts should be repealed as would all the measures that had angered the colonies over the previous decade.

American Revolution: Britain at the Crossroads II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In his years of service in America, General Thomas became increasingly concerned that by 1774 the colonies, particularly Massachusetts, were slipping into open resistance and out of the control of Britain. One of Intolerable Acts was the Boston Port Act which virtually locked up Boston harbor to foreign and local shipping, which produced smuggling. He faced mobs in the streets, the courts closed down and soon the Provincial Congress signaled a level of resistance theretofore unheard-of. Panic began to creep into his communications with London. He felt that rebellion was spreading to the entire region and begged that he be sent a huge infusion of troops from Canada, New York, and even from Britain. In the meantime he recommended that the Intolerable Acts be suspended. While the ministry in London was equally disturbed by the high level of resistance, they would not even for a moment consider backing down on the Intolerable Acts. They called Gage’s suggestion that the Acts should be suspended, “…absurd…”

American Revolution: Britain at the Crossroads I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: News of the growing discontent and at times violent resistance in the colonies in 1774 over the so-called Intolerable Acts only slowly moved east across the Atlantic. It made its way only gradually into the consciousness of the British public, but more importantly that of Britain’s leaders. Parliament was in its usual late summer and fall recess so dealing with this colonial dissatisfaction was left to the colonial bureaucrats, the colonial minister and the King. Colonial Secretary, Lord Dartmouth was concerned about reports that weapons were being smuggled from Europe to the colonies, but was more sanguine when he heard news of the First Continental Congress. Though he considered it to be an unlawful assembly, he would be open to its outcome if the meeting produced conciliatory measures. The King was far more skeptical, writing that “the Colonies must either submit or triumph.”

James Edward Oglethorpe and the Founding of Georgia II

Lead: The founding the colony of Georgia in 1732 was the happy coincidence of security needs of British North America and the need to deal with the problem of overcrowded prisons in England.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: James Edward Oglethorpe was a soldier from a family with a fighting tradition. He fought in continental armies, but was prevented from receiving a British Army commission because of his family’s strong support for the old Stuart line of royalty. They were Jacobites. After distinguished service in the army of the Prince of Savoy and a brief stint at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, he returned home to manage the family’s business affairs in Surrey. In the early 1720s he stood for Parliament from Haslemere and held the seat until 1754.

 

Read more →