Anna Larina Bukharin

Lead: As a teenager Anna Larina fell deeply in love with Nicholai Ivanovich Bukharin, a hero of the Russian Revolution, a man twenty-six years her elder. She shared his fate at the hands of Joseph Stalin.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As a girl, Larina met most of the old Bolsheviks. Her father, Yuri was one of the inner circle and often in the 1920s Lenin or Stalin would dine in their apartment in the Metropole Hotel in Moscow. Bukharin lived just upstairs and soon her crush on him became evident to all around them. Once she wrote a love letter and slipped up the stairs to put it under his door. On the way she nearly ran into Stalin who was headed that way. She gave him the note to deliver. The irony of one of the twentieth century's great butchers passing romantic notes for a love-sick teenager is inescapable.

Oliver Cromwell and Drogheda III

Lead: Ireland was in the middle of one of its periodic rebellions against the English.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

The year was 1649, King Charles I of England had been beheaded and a Republic ruled in London. Forces loyal to the Stuart monarchy and its young King, Charles II, had taken over the Ireland and Oliver Cromwell was there to root them out.

The key to Cromwell's campaign was the small strategic town of Drogheda not far north of Dublin on the Boyne River. After a day of shelling the wall of the city were broken and Cromwell's 8000 foot soldiers surged through the opening.  

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Oliver Cromwell and Drogheda II

Lead: The bitterness between England and Ireland was deepened during an invasion by General Oliver Cromwell in 1649.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Relations were not that good anyway but the rebellion by forces opposed to the new English Republic and loyal to the young King Charles II set the stage for an orgy of blood-letting that is remembered even today by the Irish as an example of English cruelty.  

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Oliver Cromwell and Drogheda I

Lead: In the fall of 1649, Ireland was in full rebellion against England.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Though King Charles I had been beheaded in January of that year, sympathy for his cause and that of his son, Charles II, was very strong in Ireland. A force under the Earl of Ormonde had raised the Stuart flag and, except for pockets of resistance in and around Dublin, Ireland was under the control of the royalists. Already Scotland had declared the young Charles its king, but it was in Ireland that the greatest menace to the new English Republic, seemed to come. 

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Titanic II

Lead: On the evening of April 14, 1912, in the radio room of the Titanic, the pride of the White Star Line and the largest ship afloat, radio operator Jack Phillips had his hands full. Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts Content: Phillips was busy sending passenger messages to friends and relatives which had been backing up while the ship was out of radio range in mid-ocean. About 9:30 He was interrupted by a message from the steamer Mesaba to the Captain, "Ice Report. Saw much heavy pack ice and great number large icebergs. Also Field Ice. Weather good. Clear." Now Phillips had had a very rough day and this new message didn't seem very important to him. He never delivered it.

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Titanic I

Lead: It was about 11:15. The cold night seem

In the radio room, operator Cyril Evans began to pick up a large amount of traffic between a passenger liner quite close by and the telegraph relay station on the coast of Newfoundland at Cape Race. Evans interrupted and telegraphed, “We're stopped and surrounded by ice. The Liner replied, "Shut up! Shut up! I'm busy, I'm working Cape Race." Twenty minutes later he could still hear the liner sending its passenger telegrams when he shut down his set and went to bed.

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Canossa (Religious History)

Lead: When Cardinal Hildebrand became pope in the year 1073, he took the name Gregory VII. He was a stubborn man and probably more than the average pope enjoyed the role the church claimed for him as God's representative on earth.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Once he came to office he began to attack the practice of lay investiture. When a bishop took office he was invested or given the symbols of that office, usually a ring or staff, by the king or duke who controlled the area in which he would serve. Gregory wanted to stop that, he felt that only Churchmen should invest Churchmen with these symbols of office. In February 1075, the pope decreed that clerics who accepted investiture from laymen were to be thrown out of office and laymen who invested clerics were to be thrown out of the church. 

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Smoot-Hawley Tariff

Lead: Few matters in American history are as controversial or complicated as tariffs. Simply put, a tariff is a tax charged on goods imported into the country. It can be a simple tariff - the government taxes imports to pay its bills. Or it can be a protective tariff.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Democrats have traditionally believed that high tariffs were bad because 1) they raised the price of overseas goods and 2) damaged the prospects for our exports. If we raised tariffs other nations would do the same and we couldn't sell our products overseas. 

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