David Livingstone I

Lead: He has been described as Abraham Lincoln, Mother Teresa and Neil Armstrong all rolled into one. But the world knew him as Dr. Livingston.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: David Livingston grew up in a devout Scottish household. His father, a strict Calvinist, taught his son the same discipline. In 1834, British churches were seeking missionaries to travel to China. Livingston volunteered, but was unable to go because of the first Opium War, during which hostilities in China prevented expanded missionary activity.

 

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Secretariat the Greatest Racehorse

 

Lead: He was perhaps the greatest racehorse in history, and his extraordinary speed and strength may have been due to Secretariat’s huge heart.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They called him Big Red and in 1973 he won racing’s Triple Crown decisively. The horse even seemed to have a celebrity’s instinct for posing at the sound of cameras clicking. Secretariat was a publicist’s dream. He was the culmination of a carefully planned and brilliantly executed breeding program by his owner, Christopher Chenery of New York and the Meadow Stables in Doswell, Virginia. He used the fortune he made in the oil and gas business to pursue one of his great loves, the breeding of fine racehorses.

Soviet Coup 1991 IV

Lead: With the world holding its breath, hard-line Communists led by the KGB, in late summer 1991 arrested Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, and tried to take over the government. A man of courage climbed onto an armored vehicle and stopped them dead.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As Muscovites headed to work on Monday August 19th, they had to deal with troops and tanks lining the streets. The coup leaders who called themselves the Extraordinary Commission had banned all demonstrations, political parties, and newspapers not associated with their movement, but did not have in custody all their opponents. The President of the Russian Republic, Boris Yeltsin, a former ally of Gorbachev who broke with him because his reforms did not go far enough, after initial hesitation, went to the Russian Parliament Building to oppose the coup. Finally, assured that at least some of the military units in the Moscow region would back him, just after noon he climbed onto an armored vehicle, pronounced the coup illegal and unconstitutional, and called for a general strike and for the return of Gorbachev. By the next morning 150,000 Russians stood outside the Parliament Building and several army units had joined the countercoup. By Tuesday evening it was clear that to succeed the Extraordinary Commission would need to use deadly force and this the leaders hesitated to do. That night, a small scuffle between protesters and a tank produced the only three deaths in their attempt to seize power. On Wednesday the coup collapsed. That night Gorbachev was back in Moscow.

 

Soviet Coup 1991 III

Lead: In the late summer of 1991, the KGB attempted to take over the Soviet government. For a time, it appeared it would succeed.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Frustrated with the reforms of President Mikhail Gorbachev which were undermining Communist control of Soviet national life and sensing his weakness in the face of deteriorating economic, social and political conditions, hard-line members of the KGB and the military began to plot to get rid of him. The catalyst for the attempted coup was a series of treaties between the various constituent republics of the Soviet Union. The republics were to have more independence which meant even less power and cohesion for the Soviet Union.

 

Soviet Coup 1991 II

Lead: Frustrated as reality and the reforms of Mikhail Gorbachev dismantled their system of control, hard-line Communists led by the KGB attempted to hold back the march of events with a coup d'etat in the summer of 1991.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Since 1985 Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev had pressed the nation away from totalitarianism toward openness and democracy. He had been less successful in reforming the economy. Gorbachev had come to power through the ranks of the Communist Party and was reluctant to jettison the main outlines of the old regime. He was a temporizer who rejected the command economy and the Stalinism that was required to keep it operating but as it crumbled, he was unable or unwilling to create a free market to take its place.

Soviet Coup 1991 I

Lead: In late summer 1991, conservative elements of the KGB and Communist Party tried to revive the collapsing Soviet system. For a breathless moment it looked as if they would succeed.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: For a dozen years prior to 1985 Mikhail Gorbachev was the golden boy of Soviet politics. After law school at Moscow State University, in 1955 he returned to his native region of Stavropol near the Caspian Sea in southwestern Russia. He held a number of posts in the Communist Party organization and was named a member of the Central Committee of the national Party in 1971. Under the guidance of his patron, the party's chief ideologue, Mikhail Suslov, Gorbachev moved quickly up the ranks and by 1980 was a full member of the Politburo. When Konstantin Chernenko died in 1985, Gorbachev was his logical successor as General Secretary of the Soviet Party.

1968: Mexico City Student Protests II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

 

Content: In high summer 1968, a minor incident between two rival Mexico City high schools launched a national movement protesting government oppression and uniting left and right wing university students, faculty, and labor unions. With that ham-handed sense of public relations semi-democratic or single party states nearly always acquire when under assault, the Mexican government panicked and resorted to violence to suppress this student movement. It saw the marches and protests as an embarrassing challenge to Mexican tranquility, the regime’s authority and the idyllic image Mexico was creating of itself for the outside world, set to visit during the up-coming summer Olympics in October 1968.

 

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1968: Mexico City Student Protests I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: Until the middle of 1968, it seemed as though Mexico would be spared the unrest and violence that was sweeping the rest of the world. Despite the occasional outburst from labor unions and student groups over the years, quickly suppressed by the regular police and the infamous and brutal riot police, granaderos, Mexican society remained an intensely conservative one. It was seemingly devoted to its one-party state dominated since the 1920s by the PRI, the Institutional Revolutionary Party. The so-called, “el milagro Mexicano,” the Mexican miracle, over three decades of unprecedented economic growth had boosted incomes, although unevenly, and began a significant expansion of the Mexican middle class.

 

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