Monticello: From the Master’s Hand

Lead: Perhaps no private residence in America reflects the tastes and disposition of its builder as does the home of Thomas Jefferson, Monticello.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The term "renaissance man" seems created to anticipate Thomas Jefferson. Lawyer, farmer, writer, philosopher, inventor, musician, politician, author of the Declaration of Independence, the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and father of the University of Virginia, Jefferson was accomplished at each, seeming to equal the renaissance scholar's dream of virtue as the governing principle of life. When he built his home high on the little mountain near Charlottesville, he deemed it almost as a gesture of appreciation for all of life.

 

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First Ladies: Lucy Webb Hayes

Lead: Lucy Webb Hayes was the first presidential wife to graduate from college but in both attitude and action she was a traditionalist.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Rutherford B. Hayes met his wife at college. He was a young Cincinnati attorney, just starting out, and would attend Friday afternoon receptions at Wesleyan Female College. Lucy was sixteen when they first met and after a courtship of five years they married in 1852. From the beginning the Hayes gained the reputation as deeply religious people of Methodist orientation. The future President was a Civil War hero, having been wounded at the Battle of South Mountain. He served as a Republican Congressman from Ohio, but it was his balance and reasonable approach to rule during his term as Governor of Ohio that made him a compromise candidate in the bitterly disputed election of 1876. Southern whites had grown weary of Reconstruction, and when the Presidential election ended in deadlock and had to be decided in the House of Representatives, the Deep South led by Wade Hampton of South Carolina voted for Hayes against the Democrat Sam Tilden, who had won a majority of popular votes, because Hayes promised to pull federal troops from the four remaining Southern states under garrison and spend federal money to help the South rebuild its war-shattered economy.

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Halifax, Nova Scotia Great Explosion II

Lead: The chance collision of two merchant ships and a subsequent huge explosion in December 1917 nearly destroyed the city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Canadians and the world helped bring it back.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the early morning hours of December 6, 1917, Imro, a Norweigian ship headed to pick up relief supplies for the suffering in Belgium, sliced into the side of the French freighter, Mont Blanc, in the narrow Halifax harbor channel leading to the open sea. Mont Blanc was load with tons of explosives and extremely flammable benzol. The encounter loosed the benzol and sparks, caused by scraping metal, set it ablaze. The ship drifted into the crowded docks of Halifax and at about 9:06 Mont Blanc blew up. The ship simply disintegrated and sent a fireball and mushroom cloud miles into the air.


Halifax, Nova Scotia Great Explosion I

Lead: In December 1917, Halifax, the capital of Canada’s maritime province of Nova Scotia was nearly leveled by the greatest man-made explosion prior to Hiroshima.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Established as a military outpost in 1754, by the turn of the twentieth century Halifax had become one most important commercial centers on Canada’s east coast. During World War I, ships, thousands of them, crowded the city’s harbor and narrow channel, the staging area for east-bound convoys bringing much needed supplies and munitions to the allies fighting in Europe.


The Armory Art Show III

 

Lead: While the works therein displayed stunned the audiences and shifted American art, not everyone was thrilled with the contents of the Armory Show.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The International Exhibition of Modern Art opened on February 17, 1913 in New York. Its theme? The New Spirit. American modernist poet William Carlos Williams joined in with the ninety thousand who attended saying, “I went to it and gasped with all the rest.” In New York the press was generally sympathetic to the display of Cezanne, Picasso, Gauguin, Matisse, Van Gogh, yet others were not so sanguine.

 

 


The Armory Art Show II

Lead: In 1913 a group of artistic innovators, rebels in another formulation, brought to the 69th Regiment Armory in New York a transformation of American art.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They were known as the The Eight. Realistic painters, former newspaper artists from Philadelphia, yet they were strongly influenced by and drawn to the revolutionary transformation of European art particularly by the Impressionists. Their work demonstrated that while most American artists drew their inspiration from the salon style of universities and art academies, this approach was not universal.

 


The Armory Art Show I

Lead: In February and March 1913 an art exhibition in the 69th Regiment Armory in New York exploded what many considered to be the complacency of American Art. It was the Armory show.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: American art in the 19th century was quite traditional, a form of realism that was almost descriptive, often termed narrative art. Images were recognizable, designed to inspire, not necessarily to challenge the viewer. The typical American artist produced works, whether in portraiture or landscape, that were recognizable and comfortable, especially to the uninitiated.

 


The Bowery

Lead: The Bowery, noted in legend and fact as a home, for New York’s alcoholics, prostitutes and the homeless, was originally Dutch colonial farmland.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the Dutch settled Manhattan in the 1600s, the land that runs diagonally from present day Chatham Square to the crossing of Fourth Avenue and Eighth Street was an Indian Trail. It led from the main area of settlement to a group of agricultural tracts prominent among which was Governor Peter Stuyvesant’s bouwerij, the Dutch word for farm. By the early 1800s it had become a well-traveled thoroughfare and in 1807 was named the Bowery.

 

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