Washington Assumes Command II

Lead: Though he had a certain magisterial demeanor, George Washington knew he was the servant of civilian rule.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From the beginning, the American Republic vested ultimate power in the hands of people in the person of their elected representatives. Though the nation admired military leaders and has often elected them to power, republican sentiment has always distrusted the man on horseback and insisted that in peace and in war power rests with civilians. In many ways this attitude, if not originating with George Washington, was certainly re-enforced by his respectful approach to his civilian masters and his willingness to give up power, twice in fact.

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Washington Assumes Command I

Lead: When he returned home in 1783, he was the most famous man in the world. It all started eight years before.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In June 1775, the Continental Congress, itself willing to start a war but not yet to declare American independence, appointed George Washington of Virginia its military commander and sent him off to Boston to confront 10,000 British troops occupying the port. In the course of nine months he would meet the men with whom he would prosecute America’s longest-declared war, he would experiment with those strategic martial impulses that for good and for ill sustained his Army and the country through to the end, and would begin the process of maturation that would shape him into the nation’s most consequential founder.

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Tragedy at the Munich Olympics II

Lead: In September 1972, members of the Black September faction of the PLO murdered Israeli athletes and coaches at the Munich Olympic Games. It was an elaborate and tragic publicity stunt.

                                                                                                                                                                                                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Beginning in September 1970, Hussein, the Hashemite King of Jordan, moved decisively to take back control of his country by attacking the increasingly aggressive PLO. Within a year thousands of Palestinians had been killed in fighting with regular Jordanian forces, Yassar Arafat and the POL leadership had been forced out of Jordan, and a new faction of extreme terrorists, Black September, had spun off to exact revenge on Hussein and Jordan. During the following months the group hijacked airplanes and assassinated the Jordanian Prime Minister, but its biggest splash would be in Munich at the Olympics.

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Tragedy at the Munich Olympics I

Lead: The tragic murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics rested on the crossroads of opportunity inhabited by the West German government and Black September, the spin-off of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO).

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is not that they didn’t try. Though they were morally and ideologically poles apart, the Nazi government of Adolf Hitler and the democratically elected German Republic attempted to use the Olympic Games, 1936 and 1972, to improve their international public relations. In both cases they largely failed.

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Ashtabula Train Disaster II

Lead: On December 26, 1876 the bridge over the creek at Ashtabula, Ohio collapsed under the weight of a passenger express train. 83 persons died immediately in the wreck which resulted from a faulty bridge design.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the middle of the nineteenth century, iron was the material of choice in the construction of railroad bridges, but after the collapse of several iron bridges, its reliability came under fire. The fatal collapse at Ashtabula was one of the most notorious incidents of structural bridge failure in the history of rail travel.

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Ashtabula Train Disaster I

Lead: In the middle of a howling blizzard during the night of December 26, 1876, the west-bound passenger express of the Cleveland, Ashtabula and Painsville Railroad began to cross the bridge spanning the creek at Ashtabula, Ohio. The bridge failed and the passenger cars plunged 70 feet into the icy darkness.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the middle of the nineteenth century the explosion in railroad construction posed a continuing challenge to bridge builders. Often the most direct route between points lay across large rivers and geographical depressions. The increasing size and weight of locomotives meant that bridges had to bear greater loads over longer distances.

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American Revolution: Gaspee Incident III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: As a part of its efforts at collecting import taxes and in an effort to interdict smuggling in the waters in and adjacent to Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island, the British Navy dispatched a speedy schooner to the region, HMS Gaspee. It was commanded by ambitious and aggressive Lieutenant Dudingston. The good captain was in hot pursuit of a suspected smuggler on June 2, 1772 when he ran his ship aground and was not able to lift it from the sand bar. Soon the ship was surrounded and boarded by locals who wounded the captain and took the whole crew prisoner. The fate of the Gaspee was sealed once the boarders had raided the Captain’s cabin and had got the crew off. They set the ship on fire and put the crew on the shore.

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American Revolution: Gaspee Incident II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the early 1770s, in order to reduce tensions, the London government eliminated all import taxes in colonial commerce save for a tiny tax on tea. The scheme worked and cross-Atlantic trade increased exponentially, but the tea tax still had the ability to set American teeth on edge because it represented Parliament’s continued determination to force taxation.

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