The First Human Heart Transplantation II

 

Lead: Building on two centuries of research and experimentation, South African Dr. Christaan Barnard performed the first heart transplant.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he was the first surgeon to successfully transplant a human heart, Dr. Barnard was using a technique developed by an American team at Stanford University Medical Center, led by surgeon Norman Shumway, who was considered by many to be the father of heart transplantation. In 1958 Shumway had transplanted the first heart in a dog. He and his associates had spent most of the early 1960s developing heart-lung machines and progressively removing the obstacles to organ transplantation. By the middle of the decade only the issue of immunosuppression seemed to be blocking the way. The body of the patient had a natural tendency to reject donor tissue as an alien to be destroyed.

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America’s Revolution: French and Indian War I

 

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is remarkable but true. The vast majority of the millions of residents of the 13 North American colonies of Great Britain in 1770 considered themselves loyal subjects of King George III. Except for a few radicals, most Americans saw themselves as ordinary faithful Englishmen who just happened to live 3000 miles west of the Irish Sea. In just six years, a Congress of the Colonies had declared independence and had fielded an army to defend that declaration with the intent to banish the rule of King George forever. In that period a significant portion of that population was supporting an unprecedented violent revolution that crafted a successful grand strategy that would create the largest republic in human history to that point.

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Spotsylvania is remembered as some of the most intense, bloody fighting of the American Civil War. It gained that reputation because neither of the armies would turn aside or give in. The fighting was up-close, personal, hand-to-hand, nigh onto atavistic, territorial, frenzied, and cruel.

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Jamestown Journey: Spring, 1607 I – Long First Crossing

Lead: After a wandering, frustrating four month crossing, the future settlers of Virginia sailed into the Chesapeake.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown – Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: In late December 1606, 144 passengers and crew on three small ships owned by the Virginia Company of London began what would be a long, tedious voyage to take up the Crown’s claim in North America. Despite many improvements in navigation techniques and ship construction, sailing ships still depended on favorable winds to propel them to their destination. For six long weeks the little flotilla bided its time off the coast of England awaiting the breeze that would carry it southward for provisioning in the Canary Islands. Then they waited some more for westward winds and currents.

 

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Jamestown Journey – Spring, 1607 II – Blessed Arrival

Lead: After 6000 miles and months at sea, in April 1607, the Virginia Company’s tiny fleet at last made landfall in Virginia.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: It had not been an easy voyage. The three little ships led by Christopher Newport had been becalmed and assaulted by severe storms, but they at last had made it. On April 26th, the English sighted the coast of Virginia, specifically the cape they named Henry in honor of the son of King James I. The ships anchored offshore and sent a scouting party to check out the place. The first sign was an ominous one as a the group was attacked by a small band of native Americans. Two of the party were wounded.

 

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: West of Fredericksburg, Virginia is a dreary stretch of scrub oak and pine known as the Wilderness. There at Chancellorsville, a year before, Robert E. Lee had virtually executed Joseph Hooker’s Army in perhaps Lee’s most spectacular victory of the war, but Ulysses Grant was no Hooker. He crossed the Rapidan with 115,000 men and plunged into the Wilderness fully aware that Lee would try his magic once again. On May 5, 1864 Lee pitched into Grant’s flank, but in savage fighting in the smoke-clouded woods the two armies fought to a standstill.

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Lost H-Bomb

Lead: In January 1966, at the height of the Cold War, an armed U.S. Air Force B-52 crashed during a routine refueling over the Mediterranean coast of Spain. In the process, it lost a hydrogen bomb.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The giant B-52 was part of the Strategic Air Command’s regular flights to the edge of Soviet air space. Fully loaded, it held four H-bombs, each 100 times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. To make such a long trip from the continental United States required refueling, and as it approached the KC-135 jet tanker on January 17, 1966, the bomber accidentally rammed the refueling boom, destroying both planes. Aircraft parts and radioactive debris rained down on the Spanish countryside. Three bombs were recovered, but the United States had to endure the embarrassment that a fourth went missing. It had lost a nuclear bomb somewhere over Spain.

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A House Divided: Union Spring, 1862 III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the fall of Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River on February 16, 1862, the North had a new hero. U.S. or “Unconditional Surrender” Grant, named for his demand that the garrison at Fort Donelson give up immediately with no conditions, was promoted to Major General and gradually began to orchestrate the collapse of Confederate control of western Tennessee and northern Mississippi. In short order Union forces swept out of Kentucky into Middle Tennessee, forcing the evacuation of Nashville and the fall of the first Confederate state capital.

 

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